Winter 2016 and Summer 2017 Course descriptions

Below are short descriptions of Winter 2016 and Summer 2017 courses*. The instructor will e-mail the actual course syllabi to registered students, or distribute them on the first day of class. Please contact the instructor to obtain a full syllabus.

Graduate course descriptions (Germanic Studies) can be found here.

*Winter 2016 course descriptions will be posted as they become available.

CENS courses
Danish courses
German courses
Polish courses
Russian courses
Scandinavian courses
Slavic courses
Swedish courses

CENS Courses

CENS 201-001: Revered Fools, Iconic Villains and Popular Bandits: Legendary Figures in Russian Culture

3 credits
Prerequisites: None
2016 Winter | Term 1
Instructor: Dariya Prykhodko

Course description:

This course will introduce students to some real (and not so real) historical figures who acquired a potent and influential reputation and mythical status in Russian culture. From earliest times to the 20th century, we will look at several Russian cultural curiosities: fools being venerated, iconic tyrants being appreciated and great reformers being damned as the Antichrist. Among others, we will examine such figures as Holy Fools, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, Catherine the Great, Rasputin and Stalin, and juxtapose the myth surrounding them in popular culture, folklore, cinema and literature with their historical representation.

Classes will use a combination of lecture and discussion formats. No prerequisites are required. All course material is in English.

Tentative grade breakdown:
Short quizzes 40%
Midterm 25%
Final paper 25%
Attendance 10%

CENS 201-003: Contrasts & Conflicts: The Cultures of Central Eastern and Northern Europe, European Magic Tales

3 credits
Prerequisites: None
2016 Winter | Term 1
Tu/Th: 4-5:30pm
Instructor: Dr. Katherine Bowers

Course Description

A directed exploration of magic as it appears in folk tales, fairy tales, literature, and films from and inspired by Central, Eastern and Northern Europe.

3 credits
Prerequisites: None
2016 Winter | Term 1
Tu/Th: 2-3:30pm
Instructor: Dr. Ilinca Iurascu

Course Description

This survey course will introduce students to to representative literary and cinematic works from Central, Eastern and Northern Europe. We will explore changing perspectives on censorship , control and resistance in  their respective cultural, social and political contexts through a selection of texts from a variety of genres (fiction, poetry, drama and essay), as well as visual documents  and films. The main aim of the course is to strengthen critical thinking writing and close reading skills. There are no prerequisites.

CENS 202 002: Great Works of Literature from Central, Eastern and Northern Europe (in English)
3 credits
Prerequisite: none
Instructor: Thomas Salumets
Winter Session 2016 Term: 2
Time: Tues Thurs 14:00-15:30

Course description:

This course is designed to introduce the non-specialist to fateful periods and events in 20th-century European history
 as seen through the eyes of major writers such as Sofi Oksanen (The Purge), 
Slavenka Draculic (Café Europa), 
 Alexander Solzhenitsyn (A Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich), Jaan Kaplinski (The Kaplinski System), Günter Grass (Crabwalk), and Richard Swartz (Room Service; Reports from Eastern Europe).

CENS 202-003: Great Works of Literature from Central, Eastern and Northern Europe  (in English)

Prerequisites: none
2016 Winter | Term 2
Instructor: Dr. Markus Hallensleben
Time: Tues/Thur 09:30-11:00am

Course description:
This course places major works of Central, Eastern and Northern European literature from the 20th century in the context of European identities and mythologies. We compare Kafka with his Polish counterpart Bruno Schulz, read old and new bestsellers (Roth, Schlink) that deal with the histories of WWI and WWII, explore contemporary multi-ethnic literature from Germany (Şenocak, Tawada) and post-communist writers covering Eastern Europe and the Balkan region (Drakulić, Swartz). We also discuss a fairy tale by the 19th century Danish author Hans Christian Andersen, film adaptations, journalistic writings, and documentaries about the EU extension, including the question where Europe begins, ends, and where its centre is located, historically and geographically. This course is taught in English and designed to strengthen critical-thinking by comparing texts from different countries and periods. All course material is in English. There are no prerequisites. Major texts are available at the UBC bookstore. A reader with additional sources will be available on UBC connect.

Textbooks (available at UBC Bookstore or online):
Franz Kafka: “The Metamorphosis” (Best Short Stories)
Bruno Schulz: The Street of Crocodiles (http://www.schulzian.net/)
Joseph Roth: Job
Bernhard Schlink: The Reader
Slavenka Drakulić: Café Europa: Life after Communism
Ursula Keller: Writing Europe: What Is European about the Literatures of Europe? Essays from 33 European Countries.
Yōko Tawada: Where Europe Begins

Films and Videos (to be shown in excerpts):
Theodore Ushev: The Man Who Waited (Short Film, 2006)
Orson Welles: The Trail (1962, excerpt) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pqPeI7-eVgc
Brothers Quay: Street of Crocodiles (1986 at Koerner Videomatica collection)
Stanislaw Mucha: The Center (Die Mitte, Germany, 2004) http://www.cultureunplugged.com/documentary/watch-online/filmedia/play/4398/The-Center
Verdict on Auschwitz (Documentary 2006, on reserve)
Stephen Daldry: The Reader (2008, at Koerner Videomatica collection)
Where Europe Ends (Documentary, Romanian Academic Society)

CENS 202-005: Great Works of Literature from Central, Eastern and Northern Europe-Science Fiction in Eastern Europe

Prerequisites: none
2016 Winter | Term 2
Instructor: Dr. Katherine Bowers
Time: Tues/Thur 11:00am-12:30

Course Description

Science Fiction in Eastern Europe- A journey through the history and politics of sci-fi across Eastern Europe from the 19th century to the present, including films by Protozanov and Tarkovsky, and texts by apek, Belyaev, Bulgakov, Lem, the Strugatskys, Pelevin, and Lukyanenko.


CENS 303A-101: Representations of the Holocaust (in English)
Credits: 3
2016 Winter | Term 2
Prerequisites: None
Instructor: Bozena Karwowska
Time: Tues/Thur 11:00am-12:30pm

Course description:
This course will examine the Nazi Holocaust and related aspects of the Nazi Germany by focusing on Auschwitz. Auschwitz was a place in which several frequently conflicting agendas of the Third Reich intersected: it was an industrial compound, a concentration camp, a medical research site and an extermination facility; it served to imprison, terrorize, enslave, and kill. Its operation as well as the so-called "twisted road" that led to it provide a horrific and revealing example of the strange ways in which the Third Reich ruled by a strange mixture of chaos and consent. More importantly, Auschwitz is a site of conflicted memories that raise the question how, and if at all, it can remembered and commemorated in ways that resist both sentimentalization and the recourse to conventional literary or cinematographic imagery. The course will explore issues by analysing a set of diverse texts including firsthand accounts (by both victims and perpetrators), interviews, documentaries, feature films and literary fictionalization.

 

CENS 303A-99A and CENS 303A-99C
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Winter Session 2016: Term A (Sept 6-December 2, 2016) and  Term: C (January 3 - April 6, 2017)
Distance Education Course
Instructor: Bozena Karwowska

Course description:
This course will examine the Nazi Holocaust and related aspects of the Nazi Germany by focusing on Auschwitz. Auschwitz was a place in which several frequently conflicting agendas of the Third Reich intersected: it was an industrial compound, a concentration camp, a medical research site and an extermination facility; it served to imprison, terrorize, enslave, and kill. Its operation as well as the so-called "twisted road" that led to it provide a horrific and revealing example of the strange ways in which the Third Reich ruled by a strange mixture of chaos and consent. More importantly, Auschwitz is a site of conflicted memories that raise the question how, and if at all, it can remembered and commemorated in ways that resist both sentimentalization and the recourse to conventional literary or cinematographic imagery. The course will explore issues by analysing a set of diverse texts including firsthand accounts (by both victims and perpetrators), interviews, documentaries, feature films and literary fictionalization.

CENS 307: Witches: Myth and Reality
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: noneugrad_courses_CENS307_Frackman_2015W2
Winter 2016 Term: 1
Instructor: Kyle Frackman
Date and Time: T R 11:00am-12:30pm

Registration Policies

  1. This course does not have a waitlist. If you have been unable to register, please keep trying. Students often drop courses due to their changing schedules, especially near the beginning of the term.
  2. Attendance is mandatory in this course. Students who miss the first few class sessions (unexcused) may be de-registered from the course to make room for other students at the professor’s or department’s discretion.

Course description

This course examines the historical construction of the witch and the context of the women and men labeled as witches. Topics will include pagan and Christian beliefs as well as witches in early-modern Europe and North America, fairy and folk tales, and contemporary neo-pagan beliefs and practices. Readings and discussions will be supplemented by related material taken from current events in addition to visual material (videos, slides) drawn from art history, early modern witch literature, popular culture, and documentary sources. Students who do not attend class in the first 4 sessions may be deregistered from the course.

*Note: this is a short description of the content of this course. A detailed syllabus will be emailed to registered students in late summer, or distributed to registered students on the first day of class.

CENS 404: What is Europe? Sex, Text, Nation
Credits: 3
Winter 2016 Session / Term 1
Instructor: Steven Taubeneck
Time: 09:30am-11:00am

Course description:
According to Benedict Anderson in Imagined Communities, nations are formed through imagined shared stories.  If we apply Anderson’s thesis then texts, as carriers of shared narratives, can have a radiating effect.  Jerome McGann has discussed this view of textuality in Radiant Textuality.  Ultimately it seems that texts and other sources of national narratives, such as films, music, media or visual arts in general, have the power to determine who belongs to which nation: who is included and excluded, depending for example on their sexual orientation, gender identity, and ethnicity, and how these groups were marginalized and dehumanized.  Starting from an analysis of the issue of New Literary History journal from 2012 entitled “A New Europe?” this class will explore the complexities and contradictions of European identity from Central to Eastern and Northern Europe, beginning in the 18th century and continuing to the present day.

Tentative Reading List
Background excerpts: Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities
Jerome McGann, Radiant Textuality  
New Literary History (2012)

Literature, Culture and Film: TBA

Tentative Grade Breakdown
Participation: 15%
Two in-class exams: 25% each, 50% total
One 6-8 page research essay:  35%

Back To Top

Danish Courses

DANI 100: Elementary Danish I
3 credits
Prerequisite: none
Winter 2016 Session | Term: 1
Time: Mon Wed Fri 9:00 - 10:00
Instructor: Jens Monrad

Course description:

This course is for students that have no previous knowledge of the Danish language or culture. There are no prerequisites. The course is taught in a relaxed and cheerful atmosphere, partly in English. We will focus on developing basic speaking and writing skills, working with the basic grammar and develop listening and understanding skills. The textbook Aktivt dansk and additional examples provide a first insight in some characteristics of Danish culture. By the end of the consecutive courses DANI 100-110 you should be familiar with basic everyday phrases and conversation and basic knowledge of the Danish language structure. UBC has exchange programs with several Danish Universities, and Elementary Danish is a good basis for exchange, summer course or volunteer work in Denmark.

 

DANI 110  - Elementary Danish II
3 credits
Prerequisite: Dani 100
Winter 2016 Session | Term 2
Instructor: Jens Monrad
Time: Mon Wed Fri 9:00-10:00

Course description:

Continuation of DANI 100. We will continue working with the writing and understanding skills by taking in shorter literary texts (easy-read) and further develop conversation skills through role-play and oral presentations. Towards the end of the term, you should be able to read and understand basic Danish texts (e.g. websites, shorter newspaper articles, easy-readers) and make yourself understandable, when communicating about basic and everyday topics.

DANI 200: Intermediate Danish I
3 credits
Prerequisite: DANI 110
Winter 2016 Session | Term: 1
Instructor: Jens Monrad
Time: Mon Wed Fri 14:00-15:00

Course description:

This course is designed for students with previous knowledge of Danish, matching DANI 100-110, who are able to deal with short, simple authentic texts and have basic communicative proficiency. The emphasis will be on oral communicative exercises, developing reading and writing skills. Reading skills will be developed by studying the texts about The Danes and Danish Culture in the textbook Danskere, supplied by short newspaper articles, films and popular songs. UBC has exchange programs with several Danish Universities, and completing intermediate Danish I-II is a valid reference for sustained exchange, study or work in Denmark.
If you didn't take the Beginners' Danish courses, but have some speaking and/or writing skills (e.g. from parents/exchange/other courses), please contact the instructor for enrollment.

DANI 210: Intermediate Danish II
3 credits
Prerequisite: DANI 200
Winter 2016 Session | Term: 2
Instructor: Jens Monrad
Time: Mon Wed Fri 14:00-15:00

Course description:

Continuation of DANI 200. We will continue working with communicative exercises, as well as developing reading and writing skills. Reading skills will be developed by studying the texts about The Danes and Danish Culture that we find in the textbook Danskere, and supplied by short stories,  articles and lyrics. Other topical examples will include Danish films and popular music. A syllabus including a tentative list of optional events will be mailed to all registered students in advance

Back To Top

German Courses

GERM 100: Beginners' German I
3 credits
No Prerequisite
Winter Session 2016 Term I and Term II

Please see the UBC Calendar for section details.

Note: Below is a short description of the course. The course syllabus will be emailed to registered students or distributed on the first day of class. Please contact the instructor or coordinator to obtain a full syllabus.

Course Description:

This course focuses on the formal acquisition of the German language. It is designed to develop linguistic skills through integrated and interactive practice in reading, writing, listening and speaking. The Program also promotes intercultural learning and the development of an international awareness.

Course Format:
German 100 is an activity-based class and learning success will depend on student participation in those activities. You will be expected to attend class regularly, come prepared, and participate actively in all class activities. Most instruction will integrate a combination of lecture, question and answer sessions, whole-class participation, small group activities, and partner work.

Your learning success will also be determined by the frequency and quality of your work outside of the classroom. Learning a foreign language requires sustained engagement with the material to be learned. German 100 emphasizes the responsibility of students for their own learning; therefore, you will be expected to work on your German every day.

Prerequisites:

No prerequisites. Please note that German 100 is intended for students who have no knowledge of German. Students who have some knowledge of German are required to take a computerized assessment of their proficiency. Please send an e-mail to Angelika Struch  for information on how to complete the assessment.

Required Reading

Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. 2nd Edition,
Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Megan McKinstry
Student Package with Access Code to Supersite Online Resources

German 110: Beginners’ German II
3 credits
Prerequisites: German 100 or equivalent proficiency
Winter Session 2016, Term I and Term II
See the UBC Calendar for section details.

Note: Below is a short description of the course. The  course syllabus will be emailed to registered students or distributed on the first day of class. Please contact the instructor or coordinator to obtain a full syllabus.

Course Description:
This course focuses on the formal acquisition of the German language. It is designed to develop linguistic skills through integrated and interactive practice in reading, writing, listening and speaking. The Program also promotes intercultural learning and the development of an international awareness.

Learning German and gaining an understanding of German-speaking cultures will expose you to modes of thought and expression outside your own language and culture. It will improve your knowledge of your native language and culture and expand your understanding of the interrelation of language, thought, and culture. It will also prepare you for further studies of German or other languages.

Course Format:
German 110 is an activity-based class and learning success will depend on student participation in those activities. You will be expected to attend class regularly, come prepared, and participate actively in all class activities. Most instruction will integrate a combination of lecture, question and answer sessions, whole-class participation, small group activities, and partner work.  Your learning success will also be determined by the frequency and quality of your work outside of the classroom. Learning a foreign language requires sustained engagement with the material to be learned. German 100 emphasizes the responsibility of students for their own learning; therefore, you will be expected to work on your German every day.

Prerequisites: German 100, or equivalent proficiency in German

German 110 is intended for students who have successfully completed German
100, or who have an equivalent level of proficiency in German. Students who have some knowledge of German but do not have formal accreditation, are required to take a computerized assessment of their proficiency. Please send an e-mail to Angelika Struch  for information on how to complete the assessment.

Required Materials
Sag mal. An Introduction to German Language and Culture. 2nd Edition,
Christine Anton, Tobias Barske, Megan McKinstry
Student Package with Access Code to Supersite Online Resources

German 200: Intermediate German I
3 credits
Prerequisites: German 110 or equivalent proficiency
2016 Winter Session, Term I

See the UBC Calendar for section details.

Course Description:
This course focuses on the formal acquisition of the German language. It is designed to advance and expand upon basic linguistic skills through integrated and interactive practice in reading, writing, listening and speaking. The Program also promotes intercultural learning and the development of an international awareness.

Learning German and gaining an understanding of German-speaking cultures will expose you to modes of thought and expression outside your own language and culture. It will improve your knowledge of your native language and culture and expand your understanding of the interrelation of language, thought, and culture. It will also prepare you for further studies of German or other languages.

Course Format:
German 200 is an activity-based class and learning success will depend on student participation in those activities. You will be expected to attend class regularly, come prepared, and participate actively in all class activities. Most instruction will integrate a combination of lecture, question and answer sessions, whole-class participation, small group activities, and partner work.

Your learning success will also be determined by the frequency and quality of your work outside of the classroom. Learning a foreign language requires sustained engagement with the material to be learned. German 200 emphasizes the responsibility of students for their own learning; therefore, you will be expected to work on your German every day.

Prerequisites: German 110, or equivalent proficiency in German

German 200 is intended for students who have successfully completed German 110, or who have an equivalent level of proficiency in German. Students who have some knowledge of German but do not have formal accreditation, are required to take a computerized assessment of their proficiency. Please send an e-mail to Angelika Struch for information on how to complete the assessment.

German 210: Intermediate German II
3 credits
Prerequisites: German 200 or equivalent proficiency
Winter Session 2016, Term II
See the UBC Calendar for section details.

Course Description:

This course focuses on the formal acquisition of the German language. It is designed to advance and expand upon basic linguistic skills through integrated and interactive practice in reading, writing, listening and speaking. The Program also promotes intercultural learning and the development of an international awareness.

Learning German and gaining an understanding of German-speaking cultures will expose you to modes of thought and expression outside your own language and expand your understanding of the interrelation of language, thought, and culture. It will also prepare you for further studies of German or other languages.

Course Format:

German 210 is an activity-based class and learning success will depend on student participation in those activities. You will be expected to attend class regularly, come prepared, and participate actively in all class activities. Most instruction will integrate a combination of lecture, question and answer sessions, whole-class participation, small group activities, and partner work.

Your learning success will also be determined by the frequency and quality of your work outside of the classroom. Learning a foreign language requires sustained engagement with the material to be learned. German 210 emphasizes the responsibility of students for their own learning; therefore, you will be expected to work on your German every day.

Prerequisites: German 200, or equivalent proficiency in German

German 210 is intended for students who have successfully completed German 200, or who have an equivalent level of proficiency in German. Students who have some knowledge of German but do not have formal accreditation, are required to take a computerized assessment of their proficiency. Please send an e-mail to Angelika Struch for information on how to complete the assessment.

German 300: Intermediate German III
Winter Session 2016/2017: Term I
Instructors: Florian Faller and Dr. Uma Kumar
Coordinator of German 300, 310, 400 and 410: Dr. Caroline L. Rieger

Course Description:

This course focuses on the formal acquisition of the German language. It is designed to develop linguistic skills through integrated and interactive practice in reading, writing, listening and speaking. The course also promotes intercultural learning and the development of an international awareness.

Course Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course you will be able to:

  • understand the main ideas of complex texts in German on both concrete and abstract topics
  • interact with a fair degree of fluency and spontaneity with native speakers of German;
  • write clearly on a wide range of subjects;
  • explain a viewpoint on a topical issue including the advantages and disadvantages of various positions;
  • apply a variety of learning strategies to succeed in language learning;
  • apply a variety of reading, writing, comprehension and communication strategies for successful German language use (reception and production);
  • enhance your understanding of your own cultural background;
  • enhance your understanding of the cultural contexts and realities of German-speaking countries.

Learning German and gaining an understanding of German-speaking cultures will expose you to modes of thought and expression outside your own language and culture. It will improve your knowledge of your native language and culture and expand your understanding of the interrelation of language, thought, and culture. It will also prepare you for further studies of German or other languages.

Course Format:

German 300 is an activity-based class and learning success will depend on student participation in those activities. You will be expected to attend class regularly, come prepared, and participate actively in all class activities. Most instruction will integrate a combination of lecture, question and answer sessions, whole-class participation, small group activities, and partner work.

Your learning success will also be determined by the frequency and quality of your work outside of the classroom. Learning a foreign language requires sustained engagement with the material to be learned. German 300 emphasizes the responsibility of students for their own learning; therefore, you will be expected to work on your German every day.

Prerequisites: German 210 or equivalent proficiency in German

German 300 is intended for students who have successfully completed German 210, or who have an equivalent level of proficiency in German. Students, who have no formal accreditation, are required to take a computerized assessment of their proficiency. Please send an e-mail to Angelika Struch for information on how to complete the assessment.

DETAILED SYLLABUS AVAILABLE LATER IN THE SUMMER

GERM 301-001 German Literature 1900 - 1945 (in English):  Turning Inward – Exploring Hidden Realities of the Creative Mind

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none
Winter 2016 Session | Term 1
Instructor: Thomas Salumets
Date and Time: T R 11:00am-12:30pm

*Note: this is a short description of the content of this course. A detailed syllabus will be emailed to registered students in late summer, or distributed to registered students on the first day of class.

Course description:

We will explore celebrated texts and films produced between 1900 and 1939, one of the most fascinating and at the same time troubling periods in European history and culture extending from the end of Imperial Germany to the beginning of World War II. 
Works, presenting us with a glimpse into hidden realities of the creative mind, will include Thomas Mann’s “Death in Venice,”  Sigmund Freud’s “Civilization and its Discontents,” as well as celebrated examples of “Shell Shock” German Cinema.

German 301-002: Twentieth-Century German Literature (in English): From 1900 to 1945: A Survey of Major Works
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none
Winter Session 2016 / Term I
Instructor: Dr. Daniela Hempen
Date and Time: M W F  11–12

This course focuses on the reading and discussion of selected German and Austrian literary works against the background of literary, social, and political developments in twentieth-century Germany and Austria-Hungary.

Tentative Reading List    

Plays, novels and short stories:

  • Gerhart Hauptmann, The Weavers
  • Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Death and the Fool
  • Arthur Schnitzler, Dream Story
  • Franz Kafka, A Hunger Artist and Other Stories
  • Erich Maria Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front
  • Gertrud Kolmar, A Jewish Mother From Berlin [excerpt]
  • Irmgard Keun, The Artificial Silk Girl
  • Klaus Mann, Mephisto

Essays, pictures and poems by Louise Otto-Peters, Heinrich Heine, Kurt Tucholsky, Klaus Mann, Armin T. Wegner, Bertolt Brecht, Rudolf Vrba, and others.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none
Winter Session 2016 / Term I
Instructor: Dr. Markus Hallensleben
Date and Time: T/R 11:00am-12:30pm

Course Description

Course Description:
Reading and discussion of literary works and film scenes from Naturalism to Expressionism, from decadence to Weimar Cinema, from WWI to WWII, and from National Socialism to exile, set in Berlin, Berne, Prague, Vienna, and Venice. Major authors and topics discussed include Nobel Prize holders from Germany, early 20th century Austrian Jewish-German writers, DADA art and literature from Switzerland. This course uses translations and is taught in English.
Reading List:
Textbooks (available at UBC Bookstore):
- Franz Kafka: "In the Penal Colony" (Great German Short Stories)
- Gerhart Hauptmann: “Flagman Thiel” (Great German Short Stories)
- Thomas Mann: “Death in Venice” (Great German Short Stories)
- Robert Walser: “The Walk” (Selected Stories)
- Veza Canetti: The Tortoises
- Optional: Marie Fulbrook: A Concise History of Germany (Recommended Background Reading: pp. 105, 110-115, 135-195) (also on reserve at Koerner Library, DD89 F794 2004)

Class Reader Germ 301-003 (available on UBC Connect as pdf file for download):
- Kafka: “Before the Law”
- Selected writings by Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Spengler, Kracauer, Simmel and Elias Canetti
- Selected poetry by Platen, Rilke and Expressionist writers (from Dawn of Humanity)
- Dada poems and manifestos
- Selected background material
- Dictionary of selected technical terms and authors’ biographies

Films and Videos (excerpts to be shown in class):
- Walter Ruttmann: Berlin, Symphony of a Great City (Germany, 1927)
- Fritz Lang: Metropolis (Germany, 1927)
- Orson Welles: The Trail (France/Germany/Italy, 1962, excerpt)
- Luchino Visconti: Death in Venice (Italy/France, 1971)
- Thédore Ushev: The Man Who Waited (Canada, 2006)
- Documentaries on Berlin, Dada, and German History

GERM 302-001: Contemporary German Literature (in English): From 1945 to Today: A Survey of Major Works
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None.
Term: 2
Time: T/R-09:30-11:00am
Instructor: Dr. Thomas Salumets

Course description:

Reading and discussion of selected literary works from West, East, and the United Germany, as well as from Austria and Switzerland.

GERM 302-002: Contemporary German Literature (in English)
From 1945-2001: A Survey of Major Works
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none
Winter 2016: Term 1
Date and Time: M W F 4:00-5:00pm
Instructor: Dr. Daniela Hempen

Course description:

This course focuses on the reading and discussion of selected post-war literary works from West, East, and the United Germany, as well as from Austria and Switzerland.

Tentative Reading List

Books:
Wolfgang Borchert, The Man Outside, “Rats Do Sleep at Night,” and “The Bread”

Friedrich Dürrenmatt, The Physicists

Christoph Hein, The Tango Player

Bernhard Schlink, The Reader

Christoph Ransmayr, The Dog Kin

Thomas Glavinic, The Camera Killer

Custom Course Reader:
Heinrich Böll, “Breaking the News,” “Lohengrin’s Death,” “Business Is  Business,” “‘Stranger, Bear Word to the Spartans We . . .’”

Elisabeth Langgässer, “In Hiding”

Anna Seghers, “The Excursion of the Dead Girls”

Luise Rinser, “Nina’s Story”

Marlen Haushofer, The Wall [excerpt]

A detailed course syllabus will be made available to all registered students in August 2016.

German 303-001: German Literature before 1900 (in English): Reading and discussion of translated works from the German-speaking countries from the Middle Ages to 1900.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none
Winter 2015-2016: Term II
Date and Time: M W F 3:00pm-4:00pm
Instructor: Dr. Daniela Hempen

This course focuses on literary masterpieces from the medieval and early modern time periods, as well as from the periods of classicism, romanticism and poetic realism. The authors and their works will be discussed within their historical, socio-political, religious, and literary contexts.

Tentative Reading List

  • The Hildebrandslied
  • Gudrun [excerpts]
  • Medieval German Tales (Wernher der Gartenaere’s Helmbrecht, Hartmann von Aue’s Poor Heinrich, Heinrich Kaufringer’s The Innocent Murderess, and others)
  • Elisabeth von Nassau-Saarbrücken, The Novel of Queen Sibille
  • Friedrich Schiller, William Tell
  • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust I
  • Heinrich von Kleist, “The Earthquake of Chile”, “The Beggarwoman of Locarno”
  • Annette von Droste-Hülshoff, The Jew’s Beech Tree
  • Theodor Storm, The Rider on the White Horse

GERM 304-001: German Cinema: Screening Contemporary Germany

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none
Winter Session 2016 Term: 1
Instructor: Dr. Ursula Baer
Day and Time: MWF 2:00-3:00pm

GERM 304-002: German Cinema (in English): A Survey of German Cinema
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none
Winter 2016 Session | Term: 2
Instructor: Steven Taubeneck
Date and Time: T R 2:00-3:30pm

Course description:

We will watch and discuss films from 1920 to 2011 in German cinema.  The idea is to gain an overview of the influential contributions of the tradition to world cinema, and at the same time to reflect on the complicated twists and turns of German cultural history through film.

Tentative viewing list:
The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari                                            
Nosferatu                                             
Metropolis                                                   
The Blue Angel                                                
Maedchen in Uniform                                                 
Jud Suess                                                   
The Marriage of Maria Braun                                           
The Lost Honour of Katharina Blum                                        
The Lives of Others                                                
Almanya

GERM 304-003: German Cinema (in English): A Survey of German Cinema
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none
Winter 2016 Session | Term: 2
Instructor: Dr.Ilinca Iurascu
Date and Time: T R 2:00-3:30pm

German 305-001: The Culture of Nazism (in English)
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none
Winter 2016 Session | Term: 2
Instructor: Dr.Geoffrey Winthrop Young
Date and Time: T R 09:30am-11:00am

Course Description:
The course will introduce students to the culture, aesthetics and ideology of the Third Reich by focusing on selected topics, including body images, drug abuse, the autobahn, university politics, the race theories of Hitler’s Mein Kampf, and occult history.

German 310: Intermediate German IV
Winter Session 2016/2017: Term II
Instructor: Florian Faller and Dr. Uma Kumar
Coordinator of German 300, 310, 400 and 410: Dr. Caroline L. Rieger

Course Description:

This course focuses on the formal acquisition of the German language. It is designed to develop linguistic skills through integrated and interactive practice in reading, writing, listening and speaking. The course also promotes intercultural learning and the development of an international awareness.

Course Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course you will be able to:

  • understand the main ideas of complex texts in German on concrete and abstract topics; including technical discussions in your field of specialization;
  • interact with a high degree of fluency and spontaneity with native speakers of German;
  • write clearly on a wide range of subjects;
  • explain a viewpoint on a topical issue including the advantages and disadvantages of various positions;
  • apply a variety of learning strategies to succeed in language learning;
  • apply a variety of reading, writing, comprehension and communication strategies for successful German language use (reception and production);
  • enhance your understanding of your own cultural background;
  • enhance your understanding of the cultural contexts and realities of German-speaking countries.

Learning German and gaining an understanding of German-speaking cultures will expose you to modes of thought and expression outside your own language and culture. It will improve your knowledge of your native language and culture and expand your understanding of the interrelation of language, thought, and culture. It will also prepare you for further studies of German or other languages.

Course Format:

German 300 is an activity-based class and learning success will depend on student participation in those activities. You will be expected to attend class regularly, come prepared, and participate actively in all class activities. Most instruction will integrate a combination of lecture, question and answer sessions, whole-class participation, small group activities, and partner work.

Your learning success will also be determined by the frequency and quality of your work outside of the classroom. Learning a foreign language requires sustained engagement with the material to be learned. German 300 emphasizes the responsibility of students for their own learning; therefore, you will be expected to work on your German every day.

Prerequisites: German 300 or equivalent proficiency in German

German 310 is intended for students who have successfully completed German 210, or who have an equivalent level of proficiency in German. Students, who have no formal accreditation, are required to take a computerized assessment of their proficiency. Please send an e-mail to Angelika Struch for information on how to complete the assessment.

DETAILED SYLLABUS AVAILABLE IN THE FALL

 

German 314: Business German I
Credits: 3
Prerequisite: German 210 or equivalent
2016 Winter Session - Term 1
M W F  2:00 – 3:00 pm

Instructor and Coordinator of the Business German Program: Dr. Petra Ganzenmueller

Microeconomic Orientation

Course description:
This course is intended to introduce students to the German corporate environment as it operates in an internationally defined market. Students will learn the terminology of the workplace while examining real-life situations. We will explore an integrative approach to microeconomic issues, i.e. one that takes into account many different aspects of a company. This includes topics such as corporate profile and organizational structure, economic sectors and types of enterprises, trade show planning and preparation, logistics and business communication, trade terms and forms of payment, company culture and cross-cultural awareness, as well as many of the everyday skills needed at the workplace. The course will conclude with a look at the German employment scene and job application process.

Our textbook will serve as the primary resource. It is supported by a strong audio component to reinforce listening comprehension skills. In addition, we will employ online publications, video and other authentic materials from the German-speaking media. This course is most appropriate for students who have completed their second year of post-secondary study in the German language. No prior business knowledge is required. Instruction will be in German and students are expected to actively engage in class and group discussions in order to build strong communication and team working skills. The course is not intended to teach grammar which is reinforced through regular workbook activities.

Grades will be based on exams, assignments, the workbook, class/group participation and an end-of-term project. Students can also take the optional exam BULATS (Business Language Testing Service) which is being offered by Goethe-Instituts worldwide. It rewards those who pass with an internationally recognized assessment of proficiency in the language of Business German.

For further information on German 314 and the Business German Program at CENES, please visit our
Business German Program Website.

 

GERM 318-001: Introduction to German Linguistics
Credits: 3
Prerequisite: German 210 or equivalent
2016 Winter Session - Term 2
Tu/Th  2:00 – 3:30 pm

GERM 325: German Translation I
Credits: 3
Winter Session 2016 / Term I
Instructor: Dr. Caroline L. Rieger   
Tu/Th:  2:00 – 3:30 pm

Course Description
This seminar provides an introduction to theory and practice of translation and translation studies. Students will get hands-on experience with a variety of non-literary texts (administration, advertising, business, cartoons, conversations, jokes, journalism etc.) and literary texts (excerpts from film scripts, novels, plays, poems, short stories, youth and children’s novels etc.) and develop skills to translate these texts from German into English and (to a lesser degree) from English into German.

Course Learning Objectives
This course provides basic background information on the theory and practice of translation from and to the target language German. It introduces students with an intermediate to advanced knowledge of the German language to the translation process according to various approaches. The ways in which theoretical concepts of translation are realized in target (translated) texts will be presented, discussed and analyzed. Through the analysis of detailed case studies of the semantic, pragmatic, communicative, cultural and sociocultural connections between source and target texts, students will gain knowledge of and engage with various techniques, strategies and procedures that have shaped translation theory and practice. Through the practice of translations of a large variety of texts students will develop solid translation skills. Furthermore, in-class activities and homework assignments are designed to:

•    acquire the knowledge and skills to adequately defend translation decisions;
•    enhance lexical, grammatical and stylistic precision in German and English through translation, editing, and analysis of source and target texts;
•    improve German speaking and writing skills through idiom and vocabulary-building work as well as register changing skills;
•    improve English writing skills through discourse analysis, contrastive analysis, peer-editing and translation;
•    analyze and evaluate target texts using a variety of approaches (contrastive analysis, discourse analysis, intercultural communication, sociocultural theory etc.);
•    reflect and analyze the complexities of the translation process;
•    understand and critically reflect key concepts in translation studies;
•    critically reflect considerations of language, culture and function in translation;
•    enhance sociocultural and intercultural awareness through translation.

Course Format
This course consists of short lecture segments, small group and whole class discussions, individual, pair and small group translations, (peer) editing sessions, interactive learning activities and student presentations. Homework assignments will include readings, individual translations, editing of translations, and written reflections on chosen translation strategies, decisions and procedures. Students are required to attend all classes, to come prepared, and to contribute to the discussions and to all class activities. The assigned readings will not be summarized in a lecture and the class will not replace students’ independent reading, but will deepen their understandings of the works and their application to the German at their command.
Prerequisites and/or Restrictions: Germ 210 or equivalent

GERM 339C: Third Year Honours Tutorial
6 credits
Please consult the German undergraduate advisor for details.

GERM 370-001: Reason and Revolution: Studies in the 18th CenturyEnter the Queen – Ancient Princesses in 18th Century Drama
3 credits
Term: 2
Prerequisite: GERM 210
Instructor: Dr.Gaby Pailer
Time: MW 5:00-6:30pm

Course description:
The 18th century represents the Age of Enlightenment, with new philosophical and political notions of the individual's personal and civic responsibilities. With the major part of the population illiterate, drama and theatre formed important venues of popularization. The adaptation of ancient philosophy (Aristotle), Greek and Roman epics and tragedies, served to address paradoxies of 18th century political reality, which was marked by monarchical rule and religious conformity.
The course will focus on selected dramas through the lens of mythological princesses (cf. list below). Important contexts concern the theory of "the king's two bodies" (Kantorowicz) and the question of gender matters, concepts of "Enlightenment" in philosophical, socio-cultural and political terms (Kant, Horkheimer/ Adorno), as well as questions of "material culture" its preservation in archival and editorial studies.

This course will be offered as an undegraduate research course (GERM 370) and parallelly as a graduate course (GERM 532). Monday classes will be dedicated to academic work with the selected dramas at the respective level. Wednesday classes will be a workshop for both groups together introducting students to archival and editorial practices, and providing training in the transcription of ancient German print ("Frakturschrift") and 18th century handwriting ("Kurrentschrift"). We will work with scans of archival material from Weimar and Leipzig, and with an original bound manuscript ( Johann Elias Schlegel's Hecuba).

The course will conclude with a public recital performance of selected scenes at the end of term.

GERM 390-001: Progress and Disaster: Studies in the 20th and 21st Centuries

Prerequisite: GERM 210 or equivalent
2016 Winter Session / Term 2
Instructor: Dr. Markus Hallensleben
Tue Thu: 14:00-15:30

Course description:
Following the leading theme of the course, Progress and Disaster, we will read selected 20th and 21st century German literature against the larger background of the political and social developments of the period, with a focus on emigration and immigration, metamorphoses and transformations. We will compare early 20th century Jewish-German Austrian authors (Franz Kafka, Joseph Roth, Veza Canetti) with transnational 21st century German-language literature (Yōko Tawada, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, Zafer Şenocak) and discuss changes in German history and society after WWII (Bernhard Schlink).

Please note: This course is taught in German, and German Majors/Honours are required to do their course work and readings in German (including a short presentation and the final essay). However, all required textbooks are available in English translation at the library (and some of them at the bookstore or online), and in-class discussions might switch between both languages. Midterm exam questions are given in English and have to be answered in English or German. Active participation in class and group work is mandatory.

Readings and discussions will be complemented by partial screenings. Materials will be available either at the UBC bookstore or online on UBC Connect (pdf Reader).

Reading List (all titles will be available at the UBC Bookstore)
Franz Kafka: Die Verwandlung; “Vor dem Gesetz” (Film The Trial [excerpt]; Short Animation The Man Who Waited)
Joseph Roth: Hiob (Film/Theatre Production Hiob)
Veza Canetti: Die Schildkröten
Bernhard Schlink: Der Vorleser; Vergangenheitsschuld [excerpts] (Film The Reader; Documentary Verdict on Auschwitz)
Yōko Tawada: Das Bad; “Europa und Mehrsprachigkeit”; Talisman, Verwandlungen, Überseezungen, Wo Europa anfängt [excerpts]
Emine Sevgi Özdamar: Mutterzunge [excerpts]
Zafer Şenocak: “Bastardisierte Sprache”; Zungenentfernung [excerpts]

Please note: This course is taught in German. The prerequisite is German 210 or equivalent.

 


German 400: Advanced German I
Winter Session 2016-Term 1
Instructor: Dr. Caroline L. Rieger
Coordinator of German 300, 310, 400 and 410: Dr. Caroline L. Rieger

Course Description:
This course focuses on the formal acquisition of the German language. It is designed to develop advanced linguistic skills through integrated and interactive practice in reading, writing, listening and speaking. The course also promotes intercultural learning and the development of an international awareness.

Course Learning Objectives:
Upon completion of this course you will be able to:

  •  understand the main ideas and details of a large variety of long, complex texts in German on concrete and abstract topics;
  • interact with a very high degree of fluency and spontaneity with native and non-native speakers of German;
  • participate in a variety of speech events, such as everyday conversations, interviews, discussions, presentations, and service encounters;
  • write clearly on a wide range of subjects, including current, controversial, international, cultural, inter- and transcultural issues;
  • write formal letters and e-mails, news releases, and presentations;
  • clearly explain a viewpoint on a topical issue including the advantages and disadvantages of various positions;
  • apply a variety of learning strategies to succeed in language learning;
  • apply a variety of reading, writing, comprehension and communication strategies for successful German language use (reception and production);
  • enhance your understanding of your own cultural background;
  • enhance your understanding of the cultural contexts and realities of German-speaking countries.

Learning German and gaining an understanding of German-speaking cultures will expose you to modes of thought and expression outside your own language and culture. It will improve your knowledge of your native language and culture and expand your understanding of the interrelation of language, thought, and culture. It will also prepare you for further studies of German or other languages.

Course Format:
German 400 is an activity-based class and learning success will depend on student participation in those activities. You will be expected to attend class regularly, come prepared, and participate actively in all class activities. Most instruction will integrate a combination of lecture, question and answer sessions, whole-class participation, small group activities, and partner work.
Your learning success will also be determined by the frequency and quality of your work outside of the classroom. Learning a foreign language requires sustained engagement with the material to be learned. German 400 emphasizes the responsibility of students for their own learning; therefore, you will be expected to work on your German every day.

Prerequisites
:
German 310 or equivalent proficiency in German
German 400 is intended for students who have successfully completed German 310, or who have an equivalent level of proficiency in German. Students, who have no formal accreditation, are required to take a computerized assessment of their proficiency. Please send an e-mail to Dr. Angelika Struch for information on how to complete the assessment.

DETAILED SYLLABUS AVAILABLE LATER IN THE SUMMER

GERM 403A: Studies in Modern German Culture 

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None. The course is taught in English.
Winter 2016 Session | Term 1
Instructor: Dr. Steven Taubeneck

Course description
Due Fall 2016

Germ 403B-001: Studies in Modern German Culture
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None. The course is taught in English.
Winter 2016 Session | Term 2
Instructor: Dr. Steven Taubeneck

Course description
Due Fall 2016

GERM 408A: Selected Issues in German Culture
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None. The course is taught in English.
Winter 2016 Session | Term 1
Instructor: Dr. Ursula Baer

Course description
Due Fall 2016

German 410: Advanced German II
Term II 2016
Instructor: Dr. Caroline L. Rieger
Coordinator of German 300, 310, 400 and 410: Dr. Caroline L. Rieger

Course Description:
This course focuses on the formal acquisition of the German language. It is designed to develop advanced linguistic skills through integrated and interactive practice in reading, writing, listening and speaking. The course also promotes intercultural learning and the development of an international awareness.

Course Learning Objectives:
Upon completion of this course you will be able to:

  •  understand a wide range of demanding, longer texts, and recognize implicit meaning;
  • interact fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions;
  • use language flexibly and effectively for social, academic and professional purposes;
  • produce clear, well-structured, detailed text on complex subjects, showing controlled use of organizational patterns, connectors and cohesive devices;
  • apply a variety of learning strategies to succeed in language learning;
  • apply a variety of reading, writing, comprehension and communication strategies for successful German language use (reception and production);
  • enhance your understanding of your own cultural background;
  • enhance your understanding of the cultural contexts and realities of German-speaking countries.

Learning German and gaining an understanding of German-speaking cultures will expose you to modes of thought and expression outside your own language and culture. It will improve your knowledge of your native language and culture and expand your understanding of the interrelation of language, thought, and culture. It will also prepare you for further studies of German or other languages.

Course Format:
German 410 is an activity-based class and learning success will depend on student participation in those activities. You will be expected to attend class regularly, come prepared, and participate actively in all class activities. Most instruction will integrate a combination of lecture, question and answer sessions, whole-class participation, small group activities, and partner work.
Your learning success will also be determined by the frequency and quality of your work outside of the classroom. Learning a foreign language requires sustained engagement with the material to be learned. German 400 emphasizes the responsibility of students for their own learning; therefore, you will be expected to work on your German every day.

Prerequisites:German 400 or equivalent proficiency in German

German 410 is intended for students who have successfully completed German 310, or who have an equivalent level of proficiency in German. Students, who have no formal accreditation, are required to take a computerized assessment of their proficiency. Please send an e-mail to Dr. Angelika Struch for information on how to complete the assessment.

DETAILED SYLLABUS AVAILABLE IN THE FALL

 

German 411: Major Controversies in German Culture: The Nazi Holocaust in German-language Literature and Film
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none
Winter 2016: Term 2
Instructor: Dr. Uma Kumar
Date and Time: M W F  14:00–15:00

Course description
Read, view, evaluate and discuss memoirs, prose works, essays, graphic novels, poems, and documentaries that portray the Holocaust
Focus on the victims and the bystanders: the Jewish people as well as some of the under-studied and lesser known other victims of the Holocaust (e.g., Sinti and Roma).
Listen to a survivor speaker recount his/her rare and precious account of survival.

GERM 412: German Media Studies
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none
Winter 2016: Term 2
Instructor: Dr. Ilinca Iurascu

Course Description
Does writing have a future? What can war teach us about media? How did we become subjects of technology? We will introduce key terms and concepts in media studies (analog/ digital, ‘old’/ ‘new’ media, spectacle, reproducibility, consumption, materiality, code, transmission , archive etc.), with a focus on debates surrounding the questions of ‘technological change’ and ‘social communication’. By the end of the course, students will be able to identify major currents of thought in media studies, survey theoretical and historical developments in Germany and North America, examine and apply fundamental media-theoretical concepts. There are no prerequisites. All texts and discussions will be in English. Reading materials and a full description of the course will be made available through UBC Connect.

Note: Cross Listed with GERM 522A

Germ 433 - German for Reading Knowledge I - Introduction
3 Credits
Prerequisite: none
2016 Winter Session
Coordinator: Adelheid O'Brien
See the UBC Calendar for section details.

GERM 433 is restricted to beginners or to students with no more than one term (3 months) of Beginners' German or equivalent. The course can be taken in conjunction with Germ 100.

Course description:
A multimedia course which provides an introduction to reading skills in German and leads to a second year reading knowledge of German in just one term. Students are expected to work largely independently. The course addresses topics of general interest and provides a step-by-step introduction to reading strategies, text grammar and basic vocabulary. The teaching format allows students to determine their own pace of learning according to individual learning and reading styles; to gain more flexibility with respect to the time of learning (e.g. the program is available online and outside classroom hours); to progress faster and to attain a considerably higher level of reading proficiency in German compared to traditional formats of reading courses. Besides the textbook READING GERMAN II – Lesekurs Deutsch students will have access to answer keys and audio files in the UBC Connect platform. Supplementary course material is also offered in UBC Connect to further practice and reinforce concepts, including summaries of grammar topics and preparatory tests.

Required Course Material
:
•    Textbook: READING GERMAN II – Lesekurs Deutsch. 2009. Canadian Scholar’s Press.
•    A highly reliable dictionary such as Klett-Collins or the Concise Oxford-Duden.

German 433 is usually complemented by German 434, GERMAN READING for Academic Purposes – LEVEL II which will be offered in 2014/15, TERM II.
Please note: GERM 433 is not available for credit toward a Major or Honours program in German and does not satisfy the language requirement of the Faculty of Arts.

*Note: this is a short description of GERM 433. A detailed syllabus will be emailed to registered students in late summer, or distributed to registered students on the first day of class.


GERMAN READING for Academic Purposes – LEVEL II
3 Credits
Prerequisite: GERM 433 (or one year of Beginner’s German, Germ 110, or equivalent.)
Instructor: Adelheid O'Brien
2016 Winter /Term 2
See the UBC Calendar for section details.

Course description:
The new edition of Germ 434, READING GERMAN for Academic Purposes Level II, is a multimedia course which focuses on the teaching of reading skills in German for academic purposes in disciplines such as Humanities, Science/Life Science, Musicology, Business/Economics. Through the application of digital interactive technology students will achieve an advanced level of German reading proficiency more efficiently than in conventional German reading courses. The program contains a great number of authentic texts from a variety of sources and by authors such as Albert Einstein, Ludwig van Beethoven and Karl Marx.
The teaching format allows students to determine their own pace of learning according to individual learning and reading styles and to gain more flexibility with respect to the time of learning. A wide selection of tasks and exercises focusing on the application of reading strategies, grammar review, text grammar exercises, extensive lexical exercises and vocabulary, will advance students’ skills in technical reading.
Since READING GERMAN for Academic Purposes Level II has been integrated in UBC Connect all answer keys to textbook exercises as well as supplementary course material and other useful links are available at any time.

Required Course Material:
•    Text: Germ 434 Course Manual: (2012). GERMAN READING for Academic Purposes – LEVEL II.
•    A highly reliable dictionary such as the Klett-Collins or the Concise Oxford-Duden or a technical dictionary.

Optional
:
A grammar reference such as: Zorach & C. Melin C. Zorach & C. Melin: (2009). English Grammar for Students of German (5th Edition).
J. Rankin & L. D. Wells: (2011). Handbuch zur deutschen Gammatik (5th  Edition) or
Hammer/Durrell, M.: (2011). Hammer’s German Grammar and Usage (5th Edition).

Please note: GERM 434 is not available for credit toward a Major or Honours program in German and does not satisfy the language requirement of the Faculty of Arts.

*Note: this is a short description of GERM 434. A detailed syllabus will be emailed to registered students before the beginning of TERM II, or distributed to registered students on the first day of class.

 

 

Back To Top

Polish Courses

POLS 200: Beginner's Polish
Credits: 6
2016 Winter Session Term 1-2
Prerequisites: None
Instructor: Helena Kudzia

Course description: 

This course focuses on formal acquisition of the Polish language through interactive practice in reading, writing, listening and speaking. Readings, projects, presentations and
videos will allow for exploration of the language, as well as the culture, literature and history of Poland.

POLS 424: Polish Literature and Film in Translation
2016 Winter Session, Term 1
Credits: 3
Instructor: Bozena Karwowska

Tentative course description:

The course deals with 20th century Polish literature and film during the period of the break down of Western civilization as a result of Nazism, the two World Wars and the attempt to build a communist utopia by force.

The dramatic events, extreme situations and social experimentation experienced by society with strong tradition of its own rooted in rich folk culture, religious belief and humanist thought have found often profound and brilliant expression in the literature and film. We will explore the ways in which writers and filmmakers have tried to understand human behaviour, probe the phenomena of consciousness and conscience, find appropriate form for complex and shattering experience, and expose, by means of humour, the absurd and the grotesque, ideological mendacity, social conformism, and the threat to personal identity and humane impulse resulting from totalitarian tendencies and various forms of socially constituted power.

Tentative Reading List:
Czeslaw Milosz, The Captive Mind (selection);
adeusz Borowski, This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen;
Maria Dabrowska, The Village Wedding
Kazimierz Brandys, How to Be Loved
Zofia Nalkowska, Medallions
Jerzy Andrzejewski,
Hanna Krall
Pawel Huelle
Poetry: Czeslaw Milosz, Tadeusz Rozewicz, Zbigniew Herbert, Wislawa Szymborska
Films:
Krzysztof Zanussi, In Full Gallop;
Andrzej Munk, The Passenger;
Wajda, The Man of Marble
Agnieszka Holland;
Kazimierz Kutz,
Krzysztof Kieslowski, Decalogue Eight
Jerzy Stuhr

Back To Top

Russian Courses

RUSS 101 First -Year Russian
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none
Winter 2016 Session, Term: 1 and 2
Please see the course schedule for section details.

*Note: this is a short description of the content of this course. A detailed syllabus will be emailed to registered students in late summer, or distributed to registered students on the first day of class.

Course description
This course is designed to develop linguistic skills through integrated and interactive practice in reading, writing, listening and speaking
Tentative breakdown of grades
Attendance  - 10%
Homework – 10%
Computer lab assessments - 20%
Quizzes and Dictations (weekly/biweekly) - 25%
Final Exam - 35%

Required Course Materials:
Marita Nummikoski, Troika. A Communicative Approach to Russian Language, Life and Culture. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2nd edition

http://elearning.ubc.ca/connect/
(for listening, weekly lab-hours and extra material)

**This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of Russian.
Students previously exposed to Russian have to discuss their Russian courses enrollment options with the course instructor.

RUSS 102 First-Year Russian
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: RUSS 101
Winter 2016 Session  Term: 2

*Note: this is a short description of the content of this course. A detailed syllabus will be emailed to registered students in late summer, or distributed to registered students on the first day of class.

Course description
Russ 102 is a continuation of Russ 101.  This course focuses on all four skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking.

Tentative breakdown of grades
Attendance – 10%
Homework – 10%
Computer lab assessments - 20%
Quizzes and Dictations (weekly/biweekly) - 20%
Final Exam - 40% (Oral Test - 10%; Written Test - 30%)

Required Course Materials:
Marita Nummikoski, Troika. A Communicative Approach to Russian Language, Life and Culture. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2nd edition

http://elearning.ubc.ca/connect/
(for listening, weekly lab-hours and extra material)

* *This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of Russian.
Students previously exposed to Russian have to discuss their Russian courses enrollment options with the course instructor.

RUSS 200: Second-Year Russian
Credits: 6
Prerequisites: RUSS 100 or RUSS 101 and RUSS 102
Winter 2016 Session Term: 1 and 2

*Note: this is a short description of the content of this course. A detailed syllabus will be emailed to registered students in late summer, or distributed to registered students on the first day of class.

Course description

This 6-credit course uses interactive approach with emphasis on students' self-expression and conversation in everyday situations. Review of basic grammar, introduction of more complex forms, sentence structures and composition. Grammar is reinforced by Computer Lab Assessments. Listening comprehension exercises and various readings of biographies, poetry, literature and historical texts will be incorporated into the course.

Tentative breakdown of grades
Attendance - 5%
Homework – 10%
Written Quizzes & Tests - 18% (12 x 1.5% each)
Oral Assignments – 12% (poetry 2%; 2 audio recordings 5% each)
December Exam – 20 %
Final Exam - 35% (Oral Test - 10%; Written Test - 25%)

Required Course Materials:
•    Olga Kagan, Frank Miller, Ganna Kudyma. V Puti, Second Edition Textbook and Student Activities Manual (workbook). Prentice Hall, 2006.

RUSS 206 -001- Nineteenth-Century Russian Writers in Translation
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none
Winter Session 2016/ Term I
Instructor: Dariya Prykhodko

Course description:

“Yes, man is broad, too broad, indeed. I'd have him narrower”, said famously one of Dostoyevsky’s characters.

Giant Russian writers as Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy, Gogol, Turgenev, Lermontov and Pushkin are renowned for probing the depth of the human soul. In this course, we will witness the rise of the great Russian novel and read several salient literary works of the 19th century, which is the period traditionally called the “Golden Age of Russian literature”.

Classes will use a combination of lecture and discussion formats. No prerequisites are required. All course material is in English.

 

The reading list will include these 4 major works:

Mikhail Lermontov, A Hero of Our Time;
Ivan Turgenev, Fathers and Sons;
Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment;
Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina;

If you have time in summer, start reading sooner, at your own leisurely pace. You will enjoy the texts even more if you do not rush them!

 

RUSS 207: Russian Literature of the 20th Century: Revolution and Experimentation, Terror and Laughter, Life and Art

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none
Winter 2016 Session | Term: 2
Instructor: Dariya Prykhodko
Date and Time: M W F 2:00-3:00pm

*Note: this is a short description of the content of this course. A detailed syllabus will be distributed to registered students on the first day of class.

Course description:

The 20th century in Russia was a period of unprecedented political transformation and radical artistic experimentation. In this introductory course, we will explore the dynamic and highly innovative literary and cultural scene of 20th-century Russia against the turbulent historical events.

Classes will use a combination of lecture and discussion formats. No prerequisites are required. All course material is in English.

The reading list will include these 3 major works:
Yevgeny Zamyatin, We
Mikhail Bulgakov, The Master and Margarita
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

RUSS 300: Third Year Russian
Credits: 6
Prerequisites: RUSS 200 or equivalent with the permission of the coordinator
Winter 2016 Session Term: 1 and 2
Instructor: TBA

*Note: this is a short description of the content of this course. A detailed syllabus will be emailed to registered students in late summer, or distributed to registered students on the first day of class.

Course description

This course employs an applied, interactive approach with emphasis on reading, writing and oral expression. Readings include selections from classics and contemporary press and literature. Grammar is reinforced through composition and exercises. To enhance the learning experience, the course also promotes the use of computer, audio and visual technologies as well as intercultural learning and the development of an international awareness.

Tentative breakdown of grades
Grading will be based on your attendance, class participation, homework, group presentations/debates, tests, one in-class essay and one final project (oral or written: student’s choice).  No exams.

Required Course Materials:
• Textbook: Mir Russkikh: The World of the Russians Textbook,
By American Council Teachers of Russian (Corlac). Edition: 03

• Exercise Book:  Mir Russkikh: The World of the Russians Exercise Book
By American Council Teachers of Russian (Corlac). Edition: 01

• Accompanying website + extra material at www.vista.ubc.ca

RUSS 306A: The Development of the Nineteenth-Century Novel
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none
Winter 2016 Session | Term: 1
Instructor: Dr. Katherine Bowers
Date and Time: T R 2:00-3:30pm

*Note: this is a short description of the content of this course. A detailed syllabus will be distributed to registered students on the first day of class.

Course description:

Henry James famously called nineteenth-century Russian novels loose and baggy monsters. In this class, we will examine these creatures. From the centurys early novels experimenting with form, language, and effect to the later centurys works including two major philosophical novels by Dostoevsky and Tolstoy, respectively. Through discussions we will examine how the novel came to be, the tension between reality and realism, and why the ideas that crucially underpin these works continue to inspire today. The reading list includes Pushkins Eugene Onegin, Gogols Dead Souls, Dostoevskys The Idiot, Anna Karenina, and shorter works by Chekhov, as well as selected critical scholarship.

Reading list:

Alexander Pushkin, Eugene Onegin; Nikolai Gogol, Dead Souls; Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Idiot; Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina; Anton Chekhov, the Little Trilogy

Grade breakdown:

20% participation, 15% short paper, 30% midterm, 35% final exam

 

RUSS 316 – Russian through Film (in Russian)

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: RUSS 200 or equivalent with the permission of the coordinator
Winter 2016 Session Term: 1
Instructor: Veta Chitnev
Date and Time: Mon Wed Fri 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

*Note: this is a short description of the content of this course. A detailed syllabus will be emailed to registered students in late summer, or distributed to registered students on the first day of class.

Course description

Using Russian film as a medium, this course is designed to develop fluency in conversational Russian as well as enhance listening comprehension, vocabulary, reading and writing skills. The choice of best classics Russian films provides historical and cultural context that facilitates developing a greater understanding of Russian cultural and social settings. The course is designed for students of different language levels, including heritage speakers of Russian language.

Tentative breakdown of grades

Attendance and participation   15%
Written assignments                  20%
Tests (weekly/bi-weekly)           15%
Group presentation                    10%
Individual presentation             15%
Final project    (film review)      25%

Course Materials:
Cinema for Russian Conversation , by Mara Kashper, Olga Kagan, and Yuliya Morozova,
Vols. 1 (2005) & 2 (2006). Newburyport, MA: Focus Publishing, R. Pullins & Co ISBN-10: 1585101184 & ISBN-10: 1585101192

Tentative list of films (available online on Mosfilm Youtube chanel):

A Cruel Romance (Russian: Жестокий романс) is a 1984 Russian drama film directed by Eldar Ryazanov. It is the second and best known screen version of Alexander Ostrovsky's classic play Without a Dowry (1878).

Circus (Russian: Цирк) is a 1936 Soviet melodramatic comedy musical film directed by Grigori Aleksandrov

East/West (Russian: Восток-Запад) is a 1999 French-Ukrainian-Russian-Spanish-Bulgarian film directed by Régis Wargnier,

The Cranes Are Flying (Russian: Летят журавли)  a Soviet film about World War II directed by Mikhail Kalatozov in 1957

The Thief (Russian: Вор) is a 1997 Russian drama film written and directed by Pavel Chukhrai.

Adam’s Rib (Russian: Ребро Адама) is a 1991 Russian comedy- drama film directed by Viacheslav Krishtofovich.

Autumn Marathon (Russian: Осенний марафон) is a 1979 Soviet comedy-drama directed by Georgiy Daneliya

 

RUSS 400: Fourth-Year Russian
Credits: 6
Prerequisites: RUSS 300 or equivalent with the permission of the coordinator
Winter 2016 Session
Term: 1 and 2
Instructors: Veta Chitnev and Dasha Prykhodko

*Note: this is a short description of the content of this course. A detailed syllabus will be emailed to registered students in late summer, or distributed to registered students on the first day of class.

Course description
This course is designed for students of different language levels, including heritage speakers of Russian language. Conducted in Russian, this course uses an interactive approach and offers advanced practice in oral work and written composition. The goal is to raise the linguistic skills of the students to the intermediate-advanced threshold and maximally enrich students’ vocabulary.

A variety of resources are used in the course to facilitate the understanding of cultural complexities, including folk, classical and modern literature, music and song lyrics, poetry, art, drama, newspaper, magazine, radio and Internet reports, film and cartoons.

Tentative breakdown of grades
Grading will be based on attendance and participation, a homework journal, two film summaries (one per semester), two presentations (one per semester) and two written projects (one per semester).  No exams.

Attend & Participation                     20%
Homework journal                          25%
Quizzes                                               20%
Presentations                                  15%
Final written projects                       20%

No textbook is required for this course

 


RUSS 412-001:  Dostoevsky in Translation
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none
Winter 2016 Session | Term: 2
Instructor: Dr. Katherine Bowers
Date and Time: T R 3:30pm-5:00pm

*Note: this is a short description of the content of this course. A detailed syllabus will be distributed to registered students on the first day of class.


Course description

Fyodor Dostoevsky is sometimes called the “Seer of the Spirit” because of his uncanny, at times prophetic ability to depict human psychology in the troubled political, social, and spiritual atmosphere of nineteenth-century Russia. His works introduce frenetic characters, intense narratives, and brutal crimes that give way to spiritual transfiguration; Dostoevsky invites us to reconsider the nature of good and evil, the human condition, and modern life. In this class, we will read experimental novellas, long philosophical novels, and a selection of his shorter satirical and journalistic works in order to understand how his ideas developed across the arc of his career. Along the way we will encounter paradoxes, madness, murder, and, ultimately, come to grapple with some of modernity’s greatest philosophical questions.

Reading list

The Double, Notes from Underground, Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, Brothers Karamazov

Back To Top

Scandinavian Courses

SCAN 336: Scandinavian Crime Fiction (in English) 

3 credits
Prerequisite: none
Summer 2017 Session / Term: 1
Instructor: Lena Karlström
Office Hours:  By appointment

Scandinavian crime novels have gained an extraordinary position in contemporary literature. This new wave of crime writing offers the potential of mirroring contemporary society in a particularly effective and refreshing manner.

Crime writing has been especially effective in highlighting such universal themes as global issues, migration problems, environmental concerns, gender roles and the ever-changing developments that define a new Scandinavia inhabited by people from all over the world. Of particular interest is the recent rise in prominence of female writers with women protagonists in what has been traditionally a very male genre.

Texts:
Hiekkapelto, Kati, The Hummingbird (Kolibri), 2013
Lapidus, Jens, Easy Money (Snabba Cash), 2006
Mankell, Henning: Faceless Killers (Mördare utan ansikte), 1997
Sigurðardóttir, Yrsa: My Soul to Take (Sér grefur gröf), 2006
Sjöwall, Maj & Wahlöö, Per: The Locked Room (Det slutna rummet), 1972

Films:
*Baltasar, Kormákur: Jar City (Mýrin), 2006
*Skjoldbjærg, Erik: Insomnia, 1997
*Oplev, Niels Arden: The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (Män som hatar kvinnor), 2009
*The Bridge (Bron/Broen), 2011-
*The Killing (Forbrydelsen), 2007-2012
*Note: Only excerpts of the films will be shown in class. Students will be
encouraged to watch the entire film on their own time; alternately, separately scheduled screenings will be arranged.

SCAN 333 Section 001- Major Works of Scandinavian Literature (in English)
3 credits
Prerequisite: none
Winter 2016 Session / Term: 1
Instructor: Jens Monrad
Time: Mon Wed Fri 12:00-1:00

Course description:
The course introduces students to the history of Scandinavian literature by reading and discussing a representative selection of Danish, Swedish, Norwegian and Icelandic texts. Close reading of shorter texts in their historical context of literary, social, and political developments from around 800 A.D. to the present, will introduce the students to the genres of sagas, novella/short story, enlightenment/modern drama, and contemporary Scandinavian films. The written work includes two in-class quizzes, a reflection (set assignment) and an individual term paper.

All texts will be available as a course reader by late August, when all enrolled students will receive a detailed syllabus by e-mail. A preliminary reading list includes the following:

(anonymous), The Saga of Hrafnkel (Icelandic saga, 12th cent.)
L. Holberg, Erasmus Montanus (classicistic comedy, 18th cent.)
H. C. Andersen, The Ugly Duckling and The Shadow (literary fairy tales, 19th cent.)
St. St. Blicher, Tardy Awakening (novella)
H. Ibsen, An Enemy of the People (modern problem drama)
A. Strindberg, The Stronger (modern 1-act chamber play)

For students who wish to further explore Scandinavian literature (and film), the course will serve as an introduction to the more specific fourth-year courses.

Scan 414: Topics in Danish and Northern European Cultural Studies (in English) - Denmark: Light and Dark

3 credits
Prerequisite: none
Instructor: Jens Monrad
Winter Session 2016 / Term 2
Time: Mon Wed Fri 12:00-13:00
Place: Buchanan B 208

Course description: Denmark – Light and Dark
Who are they, the people who, despite the world’s highest tax revenue and a mere 1700 sunlight hours per year, boast being “happiest in the world”? Not to underestimate the high quality of local produce, agricultural and dairy products, a cultural explanation might strike close to home.

Since its national redefinition by the beginning of the modern age, Danes have established a unique cultural outlook, enabling a playful and optimistic approach even to difficulties and challenges of modern life. From Andersen’s deceptively innocent fairy tales to the internationally successful BIG architecture group, whose employees are encouraged to play with LEGO building blocks.
In this course, we explore literature, visual arts, film and architecture, following developments of Danish identity from its 19th century origins into the 21st century. Works will include Andersen’s fairy tales, Modern Breakthrough artists’ celebration of the “Nordic Light”, functionalism in architecture, postmodern irony in Dogma film, Danish crime fiction and contemporary short prose.

Tentative Reading List

1.    H. C. Andersen, stories and fairy tales 1845-55
2.    St. St. Blicher, The Pastor of Vejlbye
3.    Karen Blixen, Out of Africa
4.    Peter Høeg, Miss Smilla’s sense of Snow
5.    Lars von Trier, The Idiots (film)

Additional readings will be available in a course reader and via Connect

SCAN 415-001-The World of the Sagas
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none
Winter 2016 Session | Term: 1
Instructor: Kyle Frackman
Date and Time: T R 3:00pm-4:30pm

*Note: this is a short description of the content of this course. A detailed syllabus will be emailed to registered students in late summer, or distributed to registered students on the first day of class.

Course description

This course will be an examination of the Scandinavian contribution to medieval and early modern world literature and culture in light of historical, social, and cultural context. We will examine a number of popular characters in these medieval Icelandic “westerns”: Grettir the Strong, Egill Skallagrímsson, Burnt Njál, and many others. These stories feature fascinating elements like magic, witches, zombies, family feuds, revenge, and hilarious humour. Students who do not attend class in the first 4 sessions may be deregistered from the course.

Back To Top

Slavic Courses

SLAV 307A: Literature and Film in Eastern Europe
Winter Session 2016 | Term 2
Date and Time: Weds 5:00-8:00pm
Instructor: Ania Switzer
Course description: TBA

Back To Top

Swedish Courses

SWED 100-001 and 002: Elementary Swedish I
Prerequisites: none. SWED 100 cannot be audited.
Winter Session 2016 Term 1
Instructor: Lena Karlström

Course description:
The aim of this course is to introduce the beginner to the sounds and structure of the Swedish language with an emphasis on interactive language usage to function at a beginner's level. Through different media (including film, music and text), students will also be introduced to Swedish culture. Assignments should be submitted in a legible fashion (preferably typewritten and double-spaced). Students are encouraged to make use of office hours to review homework assignments and quizzes.

Learning Objectives

- to acquire basic insights into Swedish language and culture
- to learn about pronunciation rules and elementary grammar
- to use greetings and small talk phrases in everyday basic situations
- to give information about oneself and ask and answer simple questions
- to be able to read and write simple texts

SWED 110-001 and 002: Elementary Swedish II
Prerequisites: SWED 100 or must have consent of the instructor. SWED 110 cannot be audited.
Winter 2016 Session, Term 2
Instructor: Lena Karlström

Course description:
The course is a continuation of Scan 100 - Beginners Swedish. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to understand and communicate in basic written and oral Swedish. Through different media (including film, music and text), students will be introduced to Swedish culture and taught to function at a beginner's level. Emphasis is placed on communication (written and oral) and the ability to work creatively with members of the class. Assignments should be submitted in a legible fashion (preferably typewritten and double-spaced). Students are encouraged to make use of office hours to review homework assignments and quizzes.

Learning Objectives
- to acquire basic insights into Swedish language and culture
- to learn about elementary grammar
- to use phrases in everyday life (acquiring information, talking about events and plans etc)
- to be able to introduce yourself and share basic information
- to be able to read and write simple texts

SWED 200-001: Intermediate Swedish I
Prerequisites: SWED 100 and 110 or must have consent of the instructor
Winter 2016 Session, Term 1
Instructor: Lena Karlström

Course description
The aim of this course is to further develop speaking, reading and writing in Swedish. Classes consist of communicative exercises, presentations and group discussions. We will explore Swedish culture, music and film during this course and continuing in the next semester (Intermediate Swedish 2). Assignments should be submitted in a legible fashion (preferably typewritten and double-spaced).

Learning Objectives
- to further developed speaking and listening skills
- to cover most of the elementary grammar points
- to be able to express yourself in a variety of contexts, also in written form
- to be able to introduce yourself and share information about your background, travel plans etc.
- to be able to write more complex texts

SWED 210-001: Intermediate Swedish II
Prerequisite: SWED 100, SWED 110 and SWED 200 or MUST have approval from instructor
3 credits
Winter 2016 Session, Term 1
Instructor: Lena Karlström

Course description:
The aim of this course is to further develop speaking, reading and writing in Swedish. Classes consist of communicative exercises, group discussions, film screenings and music presentations.

Learning Objectives
•    To perfect speaking and listening skills
•    To cover all of the elementary grammar points
•    To be able to express yourself in a variety of contexts, also in written form
•    To be able to introduce yourself and share information about your education, future plans etc.
•    To be able to write more complex texts including a film analysis
•    To be able to read a literary text and discuss it

Textbooks:
Rivstart A1+A2: textbook and övningsbok (required)
Prisma's Swedish/English Dictionary
Swedish: An Essential Grammar (optional)

A detailed course description will be available later this year.

Back To Top