Ph.D. Washington University in St. Louis
M.A. University of Illinois at Chicago
B.A. University of Illinois at Chicago

Dr. Malakaj specializes in late-18th- to 21st-century German media and cultural history. His research focuses on 19th-century literary cultures, film history, narrative theory, queer theory, critical pedagogy, and humanities as well as language study advocacy.

Dr. Malakaj is currently writing a book examining the influence of fluctuating literary markets on authorial agency and narrative form provisionally titled Fragile Literary Cultures in Early Imperial Germany. Part and parcel of this research is a volume titled Market Strategies and German Literature in the Long Nineteenth Century (2020, de Gruyter), which he co-edited with Vance Byrd (Grinnell College).

His scholarship in film studies includes research on melodrama, slapstick, queer aesthetics, and periodical culture with a recurring focus Weimar Germany. Currently, Dr. Malakaj working on a volume provisionally titled Slapstick: An Interdisciplinary Companion, which is co-edited with Alena Lyons and under advanced contract with de Gruyter.

In 2016, Dr. Malakaj co-founded the international scholarly collective “Diversity, Decolonialization, and the German Curriculum” (DDGC). Together with Regine Criser he co-edited the volume Diversity and Decolonization in German Studies (2020, Palgrave). Dr. Malakaj also serves as the co-editor of DDGC’s official blog.

T1 Winter 2019/20 he will teach an undergraduate course titled “Bad Feelings: The Literary Lives of Anger, Boredom, and Envy.” T2 Winter 2019/20 he will teach an undergraduate course titled “The Sexual Politics of Weimar Cinema” and a graduate seminar titled “Sex Politics and German Film History.”

In 2020, Dr. Malakaj completed his tenure as a Leading Scholar in UBC’s Green College. He is also the recipient of the UBC Hampton Research Award for New Faculty as well as a Social Science and Humanities Research Council Connection Grant (collaboratively with Kyle Frackman). In 2020, Dr. Malakaj was appointed to the editorial board of Studies in Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Literature.

Edited Volumes

Market Strategies and German Literature in the Long Nineteenth Century, co-edited with Vance Byrd, Interdisciplinary German Cultural Studies Series (Berlin: De Gruyter, 2020).

Diversity & Decolonization in German Studies, co-edited with Regine Criser (New York: Palgrave, in production and forthcoming 2020) 

Peer Reviewed Articles and Chapters

Announced but Not Enacted: Anti-Racist German Studies as Process,” with Andrea Dawn Bryant, Nichole M. Neuman, and David Gramling, Applied Linguistics (2019): 1–9.

 

The State of Diversity and Decolonization in North American German Studies,” Transnational Education

and German Studies, ed. Ben Nickl, Deane Blackler, and Stefan Popenici (New York: Springer, 2020): 85–101.

 

Introduction: Diversity and Decolonization in German Studies,” with Regine Criser, Diversity & Decolonization in German Studies, ed. Regine Criser and Ervin Malakaj (New York: Palgrave, 2020), 1–23.

Advocating for Queer of Color Studies in German Graduate Programs,” with Priscilla Layne. Unterrichtspraxis/Teaching German 52.2 (2019): 194–202.

“Introduction: Market Strategies and German Literature in the Nineteenth Century,”with Vance Byrd, Market Strategies and German Literature in the Long Nineteenth Century, ed. Vance Byrd and Ervin Malakaj (Berlin: De Gruyter, 2020), 1–25.

“Carl Emil Franzos’s Deutsche Dichtung and the Politics of Painstaking Editorial Labor,” Market Strategies and German Literature in the Long Nineteenth Century, ed. Vance Byrd and Ervin Malakaj (Berlin: De Gruyter, 2020), 171–197.

“Queer Derailment and Pederast Adoration in Carl Theodor Dreyer’s Michael (1924),”German Quarterly 92.3 (2019): 311–327. 

“Senescence and Der Stechlin,” Fontane in the Twenty-First Century, ed. John Lyon and Brian Tucker (Rochester: Camden House, 2019): 232–247. 

“Cruel Optimism and Post-68 Nostalgia in Helma Sanders-Brahms’ Unter dem Pflaster ist der Strand,” Celluloid Revolt: German Screen Cultures and the Long 1968, ed. Christina Gerhardt and Marco Abel (Rochester: Camden House, 2019): 237–253. 

The Emotive Textualities of Wilhelm Jensen’s Karin von Schweden,” Neophilologus102.1 (2018): 59–74. 

Richard Oswald, Magnus Hirschfeld, and the Possible Impossibility of Hygienic Melodrama,” Studies in European Cinema 14.3 (2017): 216–230.

Teaching an Honors Seminar on #BlackLivesMatter in East Texas” with Jeffery L. Littlejohn, Kimberly Bell, Patrick Lewis, and Julia May, Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council 18.2 (2017): 3–15.

Currently Teaching